Estate Planning 101

Notifying U.S. Bank After a Loved One’s Passing

September 13, 2023

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Experiencing the loss of a loved one is a challenging time filled with numerous tasks, including the responsibility of notifying various institutions like credit card companies. One such institution might be U.S. Bank if your loved one had a credit card with them. This step is crucial to prevent further charges, interest accrual, and potential identity theft.

Who Should Be Notified

U.S. Bank, as the credit card provider, should be notified in the event of the cardholder's death. This helps them close the account, settle any outstanding balances, and prevent potential misuse of the card.

When to Notify

You should notify U.S. Bank as soon as possible after the death of your loved one to prevent any additional charges or interest from accruing on the account.

How to Notify

To notify U.S. Bank, call their customer service at 1-800-285-8585. You will likely need to provide the credit card number, the cardholder's name, and the date of their death. Eventually, U.S. Bank will also require a copy of the death certificate, which can be mailed to their postal address.

What to Expect After Notification

Upon notification, U.S. Bank will close the account to prevent further use. They will also provide information on any existing balance and how to settle it. If the deceased left a will, the executor or administrator of the estate will typically use the estate's assets to pay off the debt.

Tips for Notification

When you call U.S. Bank, make sure to document the date, time, and the representative's name for your records. Hold onto any written correspondence, and consider sending important documents, like the death certificate, via certified mail to ensure they're received.

Conclusion

While it can be a daunting task, notifying credit card companies like U.S. Bank is an important step after the death of a loved one. It prevents additional charges, helps settle the account, and protects against potential identity theft, giving you one less thing to worry about during this difficult time.

FAQ

Q: What if I can't find the credit card or don't know the card number?
A: U.S. Bank should be able to locate the account with the cardholder's name and Social Security number.

Q: What happens if the deceased had a balance on their credit card?
A: If there's an outstanding balance, it will typically be paid by the deceased's estate. If there are insufficient funds in the estate, the debt is usually written off, though laws can vary by state.

Q: Can I use my loved one's credit card to pay for funeral expenses?
A: It's generally not advisable to use a deceased person's credit card. Instead, consult with an estate attorney or the funeral home to explore payment options.